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The Culture of Tattoos in Japan by Keo Sket

The Culture of Tattoos in Japan by Keo Sket

Tattooing is the most misunderstood art form in Japan today. Looked down upon for centuries, and rarely discussed in social circles today, people with tattoos outcast in their country-people with tattoos being banned from most public spaces such as beaches, bathhouses, and even gyms. They have an extensive history in Japan, and to truly understand the stigma behind them; it is essential to be aware of their significance.


Japanese tattoos have an incredibly old history; the first records of tattoos were found in 5000 B.C., during the Jomon period, on clay figurines depicting designs on the face and body. The first written record of tattoos in Japan was from 300 A.D. found in the text History of the Chinese Dynasties. In this text Japanese men would tattoo their faces and decorate their bodies with tattoos which became a normal part of their society. However, a shift began in the Kofun period between 300 and 600 A.D where tattoos took on a more negative light. In this period criminals began to be marked with tattoos, similar to the Roman Empire where slaves were marked with descriptive phrases of the crime they had committed. This stigma towards body modification only worsened: by the 8th century Japanese rulers had adopted many of the Chinese attitudes and cultures. As tattoos fell into decline, the first record of them being used explicitly as a punishment was 720 A.D. where criminals were tattooed on the forehead, so people could see that they had committed a crime. These markings were reserved for only the most serious crimes, people bearing tattoos were ostracized from their families and were rejected by society as a whole. Whereafter tattoos experienced somewhat of popularization in the Edo period through the Chinese novel Suikoden, which depicted heroic scenes with bodies decorated with tattoos. This novel became so popular,  people began to get these tattoos as physical rendering in the form of paintings. This practice eventually evolved into what we know today as Irezumi or Japanese tattooing. This practice would have a monumental impact, with many woodblock artists converting their woodblock printing tools to begin creating art on the skin. Tattoos became a status symbol during this time; it is said that wealthy merchants were prohibited from wearing and displaying their wealth through jewelry, so instead they decorated their entire bodies with tattoos to show their riches.

By the end of the  17th century, penal tattooing had largely been replaced with other forms of punishment. The reason why tattooing was once again associated with gangs, however, was that criminals were able to cover up these penal tattoos with larger more elaborate decorative tattoos. The Yakuza began using tattoos as a pledge of sorts to show their commitment to the gang. However, once again tattoos became outlawed in 1868. In the Meiji period the emperor, to westernize the country banned tattoos as he thought them distasteful and barbaric. Interestingly enough this law did not apply to tattooing foreigners. Thus many tattoo artists set up shop in Yokohama and began tattooing sailors, which attracted some distinguished clients from Europe.

In 1936 war broke out between Japan and China again. People with tattoos were considered to be problematic and undisciplined, as such tattooing was completely banned until 1946.

In today's world tattooing has once again become popular, they have become a fashion symbol, a symbol of toughness, but somewhere deep-rooted in the Japanese psyche, there still remains a stigma towards people with tattoos. After examining Japan's roller-coaster history of tattoos, this popularity may simply just be a phase. However, whether it still be a trend in the next century or not, the intricacies and dedication put into a piece will forever be an admirable aspect of body art unique to Japan.


Life's Wonders by Ryleigh Iverson

Life's Wonders by Ryleigh Iverson

Our Chess Spin-Off & An Education About Chess by Cullen Sander and Maxim Sindall

Our Chess Spin-Off & An Education About Chess by Cullen Sander and Maxim Sindall