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The Real Taboo by Shamsia Daryabi

The Real Taboo by Shamsia Daryabi

Every day as I walk around Hiroshima city, especially when I am in the peace park, I realized how peaceful and refreshing this town is. People are so quiet and respectful. Smiles and happiness are drawing its roots in my heart, and every second of the day I wish that every person in the world could experience this place. Taking a fresh breath and seeing how beautiful the world actually is, and being grateful for their lives.

Often I come by small parks with a playground for kids; then I wish I was a kid again so I could go to the park with my parents and play with them or play with my friends. To be honest, I miss my childhood. I can't go back but one thing that I can do for sure it is to make other kids happy and make them feel special. A few weeks ago I went to the peace memorial museum and gained more knowledge about World War 2, including when the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Afterward, We then had an event with hibakusha where, “the A-bomb survivor”, where they shared their unforgettable stories and experiences. ; unforgettable was hard for me to tolerate and hear everything. it often It o reminds me of my own country and the people that are experiencing the war.


I don't want to complain about everything in my country. But child labor, child marriage, environmental issues, and the most prominent one; insecurity and terrorist attacks every week that take the lives of hundreds of civilians. But why? This question makes me crazy. I used to not talk about; I tried to hide my pain by drawing the smiley faces, but it is time that the world should know what I have been going through. Meanwhile, thousands of other people around the globe are experiencing it as well. In the area that I live in, or even in the whole Kabul, there is not a peaceful and secure park for kids to go and play. Children between the age of four to 18 are being forced to work, and a lot of those are not able to go to school. Kids are being victimized by bomb attacks, sexual abuses, forced work, so many other purposes. Have we ever thought or considered what happens to those kids? This is not only a problem in my country, but it is happening everywhere.

So many of the HibaKusha were kids when the “the little boy B- 29 nuclear bombs” was dropped on Hiroshima. My closest friend Gulsome Hussaini, was still a teenager when she lost her mother in the bomb attack. We should never forget that decisions people made yesterday, whether good or bad, still affects millions of lives today. And today, we have the power to make a decision. Let us all start to understand humanity and make this world a place worth living for everyone. We should be considering everyone, and not lose sight of the heart of a lost kid, mother or father in the war. I want everyone to know that if we all work together we can make a difference, and make this world smile again.


An Inside Scoop From A Different Burmese Citizen's Perspective by Zwe Wai Yan

An Inside Scoop From A Different Burmese Citizen's Perspective by Zwe Wai Yan

Pakistani by Zaki Ahmed

Pakistani by Zaki Ahmed